Hallo, all! I’m Felicity as if, and I’m here to hoard (mostly writing) resources for you!
I hope you find something useful on my page. I have a tag list somewhere in my navigation!
I track the tags 'felicitytherph' and 'felicityresources'. (I used to be the former; now I'm the latter. Fairly straightforward.)

On Writing Superheroes

thewritershelpers:

Anonymous asked you 

Eh, this is a bit of overly general question, but I was wondering if you have anything on superheroes/superhero-type characters? Maybe some cliches to avoid or just some tips or even a list of superhero powers would be wonderful. Dankeschön.

What a wonderfully unique question! 
Definition of superhero: A benevolent fictional character with superhuman powers, such as Superman.
By definition a superhero should have something quite unique about them, whether its a man made suit of armour or spider powers. Something about a superhero must set them apart from ‘normal’ people. 
What you need to think about as well is making your superhero relatable to your readers. Their negative traits will help with this whether it be confidence, anger ect. 
Clichés are cliché because they have been proved again and again to work. I will list the most common clichés below.
  • Orphans/ dead parents/ live with auntie and uncle
  • Bad childhood
  • Unpopular
  • Traumatic event normally involving loss of parental figure forces them to become superhero.
I wouldn’t shy away from using some of these as backgrounds for your character, after all your character has to have a reason to become a superhero. 
 
Hope this all helps, good luck with your story!
 
-S

(Source: thewritershelpers)

10 Feb 2013

How to Journal: 6 Tips to Boost Creativity and Polish Your Writing

ilovereadingandwriting:

Your journal is a safe place to try new techniques and to succeed – or fail miserably. That’s how you grow.

So just relax and let yourself play. You have nothing to lose because no one has to see what you’re doing unless you choose to share it. Each failure provides valuable lessons. In addition, by consolidating your experiments in one place, you’ll be able to see your progress over time.

09 Feb 2013

Mary Sue Master Post

kseniasolo-rph:

A Mary Sue is a female character who is so perfect that she is annoying. The name originated in a very short Star Trek story that mocked the sort of female characters who showed up in fanfiction. It usually refers to original female characters put into fanfiction, but can refer to any character. 

Mary-Sues are characters who are usually extraordinarily gorgeous, amazingly talented, unusually powerful, and exceedingly attractive to whoever the author has a crush on. They often possess ridiculously fancy and pretentious first names — Angel, Raven, Jewel, Lorelei Bianca Julia Marizza Snape — and are very, very annoying. 

Mary-Sue is often abbreviated to ‘Sue.’ The male equivelant is either Marty-Stu or Gary-Stu.

Mary Sue Litmus Test
totalrewrite’s How To Avoid Mary Sues
Common Mary Sue Traits
Avoid Writing A Mary Sue
fuckyeahcharacterdevelopment’s Compiled Mary Sue Questions
Encyclopedia Dramatica’s Mary Sue Page
Mary Sue Generator

Les Miz Mary Sue Generator
Mary Sue Problems

If you read nothing else, read this:

Mary Sue Rant

08 Feb 2013

Ash's Guide to RPG Personality & Background

kgillsrpc:

I accidentally stumbled upon this guide, and it immediately blew my mind. It is a pretty amazing resource when it comes to character creation and development; so go take a look!

07 Feb 2013
VIA - ©

Rebellious Characters

kgillsrpc:

Made rebloggable per request.

Anonymous asked: Can you do a how to play a rebellious character guide?

This has been sitting in my inbox for obnoxiously long a time, and I apologize for that. I was going to get back to you much sooner, but there were some obstacles in the way. I hope you might still have some use of this, however.

I suppose we must first define “rebellious”, correct? According to the dictionary, being rebellious means defying or resisting some established authority, government, or tradition; insubordinate; inclined to rebel.

In my experience, rebellious characters tend to have no sympathy for authority figures of any sort—not to mention how they tend to come with their own moral compass, a solid idea of “right” and “wrong”, which may or may not differ from the rest of society’s. Rebellious characters march to the beat of their own drum rather than someone else’s, so to speak, and are not inclined to take orders from others—especially not without asking questions and raising a little hell first. They don’t like the rules and traditional values set up by society for some reason, and thus break them or refuse to conform to them instead.

I also find that rebellious characters, while defiant and not abiding by norms, also tend to be willing to fight for what they believe in. Sometimes rebellious characters also come with trust issues, which lead them to work alone, rather than with other people. The source of the character’s rebellious streak can be, but is not limited to, them being subjected to oppression or some sort of suffocation of freedom in their past.

When you take on a rebellious character, I would recommend you start by pinpointing the source of the character’s behavior, which most likely will be found in their backstory or upbringing. Some characters are so-called rebels without a cause, but for most, there is an underlying reason. Perhaps the character’s parents or guardians were unnecessarily strict or overprotective as the character grew up, leading to them rebelling once they got older, in an attempt of gaining some sort of freedom. Maybe the character has ran into a lot of trouble with law enforcement, bullies, or other authority figures, and is now rebelling against them as a result. Or, perhaps the character is part of an oppressed minority or group of people, perhaps in a post-apocalyptic or dystopian setting of sorts, and is rebelling in order to gain control again. These are all very valid, but very different, types of rebellious; and your character’s motives as well as actions would depend on the underlying cause for it. Always begin by identifying the why, and then move on to the how.

When people ask me for advice on portraying a character with a certain personality trait, I also tend to remind them not to build the entire character on that one trait. Yes, it might be their most dominant characteristic, but don’t forget to focus on their other traits as well, both positives and negatives. Just because your character is described as rebellious, that doesn’t mean they have to rebel 24/7 either; basically, be careful not to overdo it. Perhaps your character only has a problem with a certain type of authority figure, rather than all of them—and perhaps there are people in the character’s life they trust enough to take “orders” from, even though they might not listen to other people. It depends entirely on your character, really, and is something you will need to evaluate on a case by case basis.

There are plenty of characters who could be described as rebellious in popular culture—books, television, films—so, if you want some further inspiration, you could try to read up on a few of them. Some well-known rebellious characters from pop culture I could think of right on the spot include Harry Potter from Harry Potter, Katniss Everdeen from The Hunger Games, Dean Winchester from Supernatural, Faith Lehane from Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Mal Reynolds from Firefly, as well as Wolverine from the Marvel Universe.

I’ve also gathered some links for you where you can do additional research or find more inspiration, aside from the things I’ve already said. Check these out, for instance:

Hopefully this helped!

06 Feb 2013
VIA - ©
halemorerph:

RESEARCH FOR PLOTS






This is a guide that applies to all aspects of the roleplay community from groups to 1x1 and everything in between.







Read More

halemorerph:

RESEARCH FOR PLOTS

This is a guide that applies to all aspects of the roleplay community from groups to 1x1 and everything in between.

Read More

05 Feb 2013
amandaonwriting:

What is a denouement?
The word is from French and means ‘untying’. 
It is the final part of a work of fiction where strands of the plot are drawn together and matters are explained or resolved. The denouement occurs after the climax of the plot. Secrets are revealed and loose ends tied up.
Only use a denouement if it adds to your story, or if your plot requires one.
Three Examples of Effective Denouements
Romeo and Juliet: The climax is the death of Romeo and Juliet. The denouement comes when the families find their bodies and they are told their deaths are a result of the family feud. 
To Kill a Mockingbird: The climax of the story is the attack on Scout. The denouement includes the Sheriff and Atticus trying to cover up Boo Radley’s stabbing of Bob Ewell, and Jem coming to terms with the injustice of the trial. 
The Silence of the Lambs: The climax is the capture of Buffalo Bill. The denouement is Hannibal’s phone call to Clarice Starling telling her he’s having a friend for dinner. 
Source for Image
by Amanda Patterson from Writers Write

amandaonwriting:

What is a denouement?

The word is from French and means ‘untying’. 

It is the final part of a work of fiction where strands of the plot are drawn together and matters are explained or resolved. The denouement occurs after the climax of the plot. Secrets are revealed and loose ends tied up.

Only use a denouement if it adds to your story, or if your plot requires one.

Three Examples of Effective Denouements

  1. Romeo and Juliet: The climax is the death of Romeo and Juliet. The denouement comes when the families find their bodies and they are told their deaths are a result of the family feud. 
  2. To Kill a Mockingbird: The climax of the story is the attack on Scout. The denouement includes the Sheriff and Atticus trying to cover up Boo Radley’s stabbing of Bob Ewell, and Jem coming to terms with the injustice of the trial. 
  3. The Silence of the Lambs: The climax is the capture of Buffalo Bill. The denouement is Hannibal’s phone call to Clarice Starling telling her he’s having a friend for dinner. 

Source for Image

by Amanda Patterson from Writers Write

04 Feb 2013

Writing Tips: Proofreading

kgillsrpc:

I’m currently finishing up a university degree in journalism, and I’ve been doing journalistic work for newspapers and radio alike for some years now. It’s a line of work wherein proofreading is essential. People are paying to read a piece you’ve written, which means you simply can’t allow for an article to be printed while it’s still half-finished; sans proofreading.

Even though proofreading might seem like a tedious task to some, I tend to think of it as the icing on the cake when it comes to creative writing as well—that final touch to perfect a piece of writing in order to make it even better. However, I’ve found that some roleplayers and writers seem to lack the tools to do so, perhaps as a result of not knowing what to look for.

So, here are a few tips on how to go about proofreading something you’ve written.

Use a spell-checker

If your text editor doesn’t have a built-in one, you can find ones online as well, such as here, and here. Tumblr also has its own spell-checker, located between the link and read more buttons above your post editor. Keep in mind that a spell-checker will only reveal typos and errors in spelling, and while this is a good place to begin, more often than not you will have to go further than that.

Double-check your punctuation

Make sure you’re using commas, apostrophes and other forms of punctuation marks correctly, and beware of double or triple spacing (when someone types   like this, it tends to  be annoying and leaves  ugly holes in the running   text), as you should only use one space after each word or punctuation mark.

Double-check your word use

This is where a thesaurus and a dictionary come in handy. Make sure the words you’ve chosen have been use in the right context; seeing as you may sometimes think a word means something it actually doesn’t. Some synonyms may also have slightly different connotations or nuances, in spite of the meaning being essentially the same. It’s especially important you double-check more difficult words, or words you don’t use that often. Commonly confused word pairs can also be tricky, so pay specific attention to those.

Look for missing words and odd sentence structures

Sometimes I will come up with a specific wording only to change my mind mid-writing; and once I proofread, I come to realize I’ve used half the original sentence combined with the ending I thought up for the new sentence. When changing one’s mind about a particular wording, some words can also get lost in the process, or become jumbled up. This can sometimes be difficult to spot (especially since spell-checkers don’t pick up on it), but the only thing you really can do, is to make sure all of your individual sentences make sense, and that no important words have been left out.

Check your grammar

This bit goes hand in hand with checking your word use and punctuation, and is perhaps the most difficult part of proofreading, especially if you don’t have a good eye for spotting grammatical errors. Luckily this is something you will most likely become more skilled at once you become more well-versed at proofreading, but until then, there are online grammar checkers available for you to use: such as here, and here.

Beware of repeats

Repeating certain words or phrases can be a highly effective rhetorical tool when it’s done on purpose; however, when you do it unconsciously, it can become highly annoying to the reader, and also makes the text seem less fluent as it tends to introduce a pause. It’s not as big of a deal when it happens with words that are used all the time to form sentences or bind them together, but less commonly used or longer words can be problematic when repeated, as they are more noticeable to the eye. So, be careful of using the same word several times in sentences following one another, or even in the same paragraph. Use synonyms or a thesaurus check if you must, but an even better way of going about it is probably rewriting some of the sentences in order to avoid that choice of words entirely.

Check your sentence lengths

This quote by Gary Provost probably best describes what I’m trying to go for here. If you keep piling several sentences of about the same length after one another, your writing tends to become slightly monotonous and dull; not to mention how pauses are introduced where you might not intend for them to exist, in turn making the text more difficult to read. Try to vary the sentence lengths, and using long, short, and medium-length sentences mixed with one another.

Read, read, and read

I sometimes read through a piece of writing up to five times or more when proofreading. During the first read-through I spot maybe a few errors, and during the second, I spot such errors I missed during the first read-through. The risk of becoming blind to your own writing is rather prominent (which can be helped by asking a friend to read it, too), but don’t be afraid or too lazy to read your own writing more than once.

And finally; read aloud

I have found that the most effective way of noticing if something is amiss, is reading the piece I’ve written aloud. It might seem a little ridiculous while you’re doing it, but it really does help you spot incomplete sentences, odd or difficult sentence structures, and pauses in awkward places.

Considering the vastness of the English language, there are probably a million other things you could try to look for as well; but I believe I’ve managed to cover the essentials. Keep in mind that this is simply what I try to do when it comes to proofreading and editing; you might not be as nitpicky as I am, which probably also means you will be happy with a less thorough proofreading session.

03 Feb 2013
VIA - ©

10 Tips To Think More Creatively

psych-facts:

1. Reframe The Problem or Phrase Question Differently 

When we phrase a question or problem in a different light, we are more likely to find more solutions. We often look at things from a single angle preventing us from seeing all the possibilities.  Some ways to think more creatively for this are  to phrase the question differently or to put the problems in a different scenario. 

2. Avoid Logical Thinking

Logical thinking can prevent us from innovative thoughts, because when we think logically we only use what we know. Creative ideas are built from what we do not know. To facilitate this process, you can look for inspirations from music, arts or people. Or you can use your dreams to come up with solutions. Studies show that dreams help us problem solve and one advantage is that dreams do not follow logic, but instead give us insights. 

3. Avoid Following Rules 

This point relates back to point 2, because we usually stick to rigid ideas or beliefs about how things work or should work. Instead, we should become more flexible and ask ourselves the question ‘what if?’ What if we tried? 

Read More

02 Feb 2013

The 4 Most Common Mistakes Fiction Editors See

officialwritersclub:

The 4 Most Common Mistakes Fiction Editors See

Wouldn’t it be great if nobody ever needed an editor? If all of our stories and novels appeared in readers’ minds just as beautifully and vividly and succinctly they do in our own? 


Wouldn’t it be great if the story we think we’ve told were, in fact, the story we’ve told? 


There are more aspiring writers producing more manuscripts now than ever before history, and the writing-advice industry is keeping stride with totally conflicting instructions. 


The result: everybody’s doing it, but nobody knows what the heck is going on. 

I’d like to simplify that a little for you. Before you rush your beloved manuscript off to an editor, here are the four most common mistakes fiction editors see: 


1. Unfocused structure 


This is the biggest reason manuscripts get rejected. You’re telling a wonderful, powerful, gripping, complex story… but you’re the only person who actually knows that. Everyone else sees a long, rambling, uneven tale of various events happening to various characters. Why? What makes these things happen? And, most important to your reader, why are you telling us this? 


Every novel needs a focus. What’s your point? What is it that you want the reader to know? That focus is your Climax, the one part your story simply could not do without. “I died of romanticism.” “I almost got et by a whale.” “I pretty nearly wrecked my life being a selfish grinch.” 


At the same time, every novel needs a really good reason for the reader to care. That’s your Hook. The reader may have picked your book up for its snazzy cover, but you desperately need them not to put it down


And every novel needs a series of intriguing, hair-raising, addictive events carrying the reader from the Hook to the Climax. You could just tell us the Climax. “The butler did it.” But long fiction is all about the wonderful, rollicking adventure building upon why that matters. 


The hardest thing for aspiring writers to believe is that all this is holographic: what’s essential for the novel is also essential for the chapter, episode, even scene. Every single one of them needs a Climax, Hook, and some type of events leading from one to the other. 


Read that again. Every single one. 


2. Misplaced backstory 


We live in a chronological world, so it makes sense to assume whatever happens first to your characters should appear first in your novel. 


Unfortunately, we don’t read in a chronological world. We read for excitement. We read for the thrill of our blood pressure being inflated, soothed, then inflated again. We read for the rollercoaster ride


All fiction starts with a Hook—the gripping thing that first sends these particular characters careening toward that particular doom. Yes, the backstory that influences and directs the rollercoaster matters, but the reader’s willing to wait until Chapter Two or even Three to learn about it. 


They’re hopping aboard not because they understand exactly what’s going on, but because they simply care too much about Chapter One to put it down. 


3. Underdeveloped character 


This point can be difficult for the aspiring writer to grasp, because it just involves so darn much time. You know these characters! They’ve been coming to you in your dreams for years! Everything they do and say on the page makes perfect sense. How could it not be obvious? 


I’m sorry. It’s not. 


The craft of fiction is the craft of telepathy, of projecting the characters who are so much a part of your life and heart into the lives and hearts of total strangers. In order to do that, you need to spend an extraordinary amount of time getting to know them—not just their statistical data (although that’s a good start), but deep, complicated, intangible, detailed knowledge of them as living, breathing, suffering, contrasting individuals. You need to know their mannerisms, gestures, and expressions. You need to know their foibles, misconceptions, paradoxical needs. And, most of all, you need to know what they’re hiding from themselves


Because how that comes to light is your story. 


4. Unpolished prose 


You simply have to learn how to write clearly. I know—no one can line edit their own work. This is true, and it sucks. But everyone can learn to write more clearly than they do. 


Simple syntax: subject-verb. Simple rhythms: subtle variations on a few short sentences and a long, or a few longs and a short. Building and falling tension. Proper grammar and punctuation. Details that matter, both big to encompass atmosphere and tiny to create three-dimensional images. 


Classic language is simple language. The reader’s pleasure lies not in the effort you put into a trumpeting voice, but in how invisible you make the words, just how close you can get to telepathy. 


It lies in how your story rises up through all that clarity—a treasure surfacing from deep water. 

01 Feb 2013